Describing the album, Gandelsman says: "similar to the Sonatas and Partitas, living in the world of the cello suites feels like working in a scientist's lab - the compositions radiate with the joy of continuously finding new ways to expand the technical and emotional possibilities of the instrument, through the simple act of imagining the impossible, and then putting it down on paper. What I see is an implication for infinite possibilities, the way an incredible improviser can find endless variation within the simplest form. I've been thinking a lot about one of my favorite musicians, the Irish fiddler Martin Hayes. Seeing Martin weave together a medley of Irish tunes is very similar to seeing and experiencing amazing magic - I'm always left dumbfounded, how did he do that? His art is never flashy, never tries to impress - it flows directly from the source material. There is a delight to it that is very similar to the joy I see in Bach's compositions, and there is also something very humble about the process. It's not setting out to change the world, or write the greatest piece ever written - instead, it's a scientist's life-long pursuit of finding out what else might be in there, what layers might still be hiding; engaging one's imagination, but also being able to then actually do what you've imagined. That's beautiful."
Describing the album, Gandelsman says: "similar to the Sonatas and Partitas, living in the world of the cello suites feels like working in a scientist's lab - the compositions radiate with the joy of continuously finding new ways to expand the technical and emotional possibilities of the instrument, through the simple act of imagining the impossible, and then putting it down on paper. What I see is an implication for infinite possibilities, the way an incredible improviser can find endless variation within the simplest form. I've been thinking a lot about one of my favorite musicians, the Irish fiddler Martin Hayes. Seeing Martin weave together a medley of Irish tunes is very similar to seeing and experiencing amazing magic - I'm always left dumbfounded, how did he do that? His art is never flashy, never tries to impress - it flows directly from the source material. There is a delight to it that is very similar to the joy I see in Bach's compositions, and there is also something very humble about the process. It's not setting out to change the world, or write the greatest piece ever written - instead, it's a scientist's life-long pursuit of finding out what else might be in there, what layers might still be hiding; engaging one's imagination, but also being able to then actually do what you've imagined. That's beautiful."
683615156210
Js Bach: Complete Cello Suites
Artist: Johnny Gandelsman
Format: Vinyl
New: Available 44.99
Wish

Available Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Cello Suite No.1 in G Major, BWV1007 (Transcribed to D Major) I. Prélude
2. Cello Suite No.1 in G Major, BWV 1007 (Transcribed to D Major) II. Allemande
3. Cello Suite No.1 in G Major, BWV 1007 (Transcribed to D Major) III. Courante
4. Cello Suite No.1 in G Major, BWV 1007 (Transcribed to D Major) IV. Sarabande
5. Cello Suite No.1 in G Major, BWV 1007 (Transcribed to D Major) V. Menuet I ; II
6. Cello Suite No.1 in G Major, BWV 1007 (Transcribed to D Major) VI. Gigue
7. Suite No.2 in D minor, BWV 1008 (Transcribed to a Minor) I. Prelude
8. Suite No.2 in D minor, BWV 1008 (Transcribed to a Minor) II. Allemande
9. Suite No.2 in D minor, BWV 1008 (Transcribed to a Minor) III. Courante 1
10. Suite No.2 in D minor, BWV 1008 (Transcribed to a Minor) IV. Sarabande 1
11. Suite No.2 in D minor, BWV 1008 (Transcribed to a Minor) V. Menuet I ; II 1
12. Suite No.2 in D minor, BWV 1008 (Transcribed to a Minor) VI. Gigue 1
13. Suite No.3 in C Major, BWV 1009 (Transcribed to G Major) I. Prelude 1
14. Suite No.3 in C Major BWV 1009 (Transcribed to G Major) II. Allemande 1
15. Suite No.3 in C Major BWV 1009 (Transcribed to G Major) III. Courante 1
16. Suite No.3 in C Major BWV 1009 (Transcribed to G Major) IV. Sarabande 1
17. Suite No.3 in C Major BWV 1009 (Transcribed to G Major) V. Bourree I ; II 1
18. Suite No.3 in C Major BWV 1009 (Transcribed to G Major) VI. Gigue 1
19. Suite No.4 in E-Flat Major, BWV 1010 (Transcribed to B-Flat Major) I. Prelude 2
20. Suite No.4 in E-Flat Major, BWV 1010 (Transcribed to B-Flat Major) II. Allemande 2
21. Suite No.4 in E-Flat Major, BWV 1010 (Transcribed to B-Flat Major) III. Courante 2
22. Suite No.4 in E-Flat Major, BWV 1010 (Transcribed to B-Flat Major) IV. Sarabande 2
23. Suite No.4 in E-Flat Major, BWV 1010 (Transcribed to B-Flat Major) V. Bourree I and II 2
24. Suite No.4 in E-Flat Major, BWV 1010 (Transcribed to B-Flat Major) VI. Gigue 2
25. Suite No.5 in C minor, BWV 1011 (Transcribed to G minor) I. Prelude 2
26. Suite No.5 in C minor, BWV 1011 (Transcribed to G minor) II. Allemande 2
27. Suite No.5 in C minor, BWV 1011 (Transcribed to G minor) III. Courante 2
28. Suite No.5 in C minor, BWV 1011 (Transcribed to G minor) IV. Sarabande 2
29. Suite No.5 in C minor, BWV 1011 (Transcribed to G minor) V. Gavotte I ; II 3
30. Suite No.5 in C minor, BWV 1011 (Transcribed to G minor) VI. Gigue 3
31. Suite No.6 in D Major, BWV 1012 I. Prelude 3
32. Suite No.6 in D Major, BWV 1012 II. Allemande 3
33. Suite No.6 in D Major, BWV 1012 III. Courante 3
34. Suite No.6 in D Major, BWV 1012 IV. Sarabande 3
35. Suite No.6 in D Major, BWV 1012 V. Gavotte I ; II 3
36. Suite No.6 in D Major, BWV 1012 VI. Gigue

More Info:

Describing the album, Gandelsman says: "similar to the Sonatas and Partitas, living in the world of the cello suites feels like working in a scientist's lab - the compositions radiate with the joy of continuously finding new ways to expand the technical and emotional possibilities of the instrument, through the simple act of imagining the impossible, and then putting it down on paper. What I see is an implication for infinite possibilities, the way an incredible improviser can find endless variation within the simplest form. I've been thinking a lot about one of my favorite musicians, the Irish fiddler Martin Hayes. Seeing Martin weave together a medley of Irish tunes is very similar to seeing and experiencing amazing magic - I'm always left dumbfounded, how did he do that? His art is never flashy, never tries to impress - it flows directly from the source material. There is a delight to it that is very similar to the joy I see in Bach's compositions, and there is also something very humble about the process. It's not setting out to change the world, or write the greatest piece ever written - instead, it's a scientist's life-long pursuit of finding out what else might be in there, what layers might still be hiding; engaging one's imagination, but also being able to then actually do what you've imagined. That's beautiful."